Draft progressions on high school Algebra and Functions

I’m pleased to be able to give you the draft progressions on Algebra and Functions. These progressions are somewhat different from the K–8 progressions. Since the high school standards are not arranged into courses, the progressions are really more like descriptions than progressions; they are not in any particular curricular order. Furthermore, because each one covers a topic that occupies a large part of the high school curriculum, it gives less detail about how each standard might be addressed or how different standards might be arranged into various different curricular implementations.

Comments as always are welcome in the relevant forums: Algebra or Functions.

About Bill McCallum

I was born in Australia and came to the United States to pursue a Ph. D. in mathematics at Harvard University, met my wife, and never went back. I am a professor at the University of Arizona, working in number theory and mathematics education.
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13 Responses to Draft progressions on high school Algebra and Functions

  1. nancymclaughlin says:

    We (a college where I work as adjunct) are planning a three credit course for those math folks who would like to become “Math specialists” in school districts. This would include math coaches, math administrators, math coordinators and all the various names describing these leaders.

    We are looking for a suitable book for the course. The problem I am having is the currency of these type books. We would like a CCSS perspective hence a Copyright after 2011. Any suggestions?

    Thank you!

    • Dear Nancy,

      My name is Matt Friedman and I am an editor in Scholastic’s Classroom Magazines’ division. I am always curious to hear what resources teachers find helpful, and I wondered if you gotten to look at the book Bill suggested below. Could you you know if you found the book to be useful or if you found other resources that were out all in planning the course you discussed above?

      Also, what university do you work for? The course you mentioned sounds very useful— I’m interested to learn more about it. Any information you can provide would be appreciated.

      Thanks so much.

      Best,
      Matt Friedman
      mfriedman at scholastic dot com

  2. Bill McCallum says:

    I assume you are talking about elementary grades here? If so, you might want to look at Sybilla Beckmann’s book, since she was involved in the writing of both Curriculum Focal Points and the Common Core, and there is probably some harmony.

  3. dseabold says:

    Bill, this progression is not showing up in a search for ‘progression’ for this site. I have a search results link posted on my website and the high school one is not showing up. Can you help me out?

  4. HeatherBrown says:

    On page 16 of the Functions Progressions, it references the Modeling Progressions. Is this available or is this just a teaser for what is to come next?

  5. HeatherBrown says:

    Page 3 of the Algebra Functions ends with “for…”

  6. HeatherBrown says:

    One more thing… page 12 of the Algebra Progressions says “Give Example in Margin”. Do you have any good ideas for an example?
    (Maybe I should have waited and put everything in one message. There are a couple of other small typos, let me know if you want them before the next draft.)

  7. HeatherBrown says:

    On page 10 of the Algebra document, there is an arrow connecting x^2=4 to x=+-2. Are we considering this standard notation that a student should know and use, or is this considered more short-hand for mathematicians that already know the math? if we are considering this standard notation, should we start using it in earlier grades – some places we already see elementary teachers doing this, but then some teachers incorrectly drop the arrow to just an equals sign.
    What are your thoughts?

  8. Bill McCallum says:

    No, this is not being recommended as standard notation for students, I’ll make that clear in the next draft.

  9. Pingback: NEK CCSSM HS Functions Presentation | WatsonMath.com

  10. Jim says:

    page 7: “A consequency of the Remainder Theorem”